Post-show discussions – November 25-December 3

Sorry for the delay – we’ve had a busy couple of weeks, with some great discussions, a reading of Blue Surge, a trip to see Suzan-Lori Parks’s 365 Days / 365 Plays (which we’ll be working on next September), and a performance without lights. I’ll try to catch up quickly here, and write about all the excitement in the next couple of days.

There’s an issue that’s been coming up at almost every post-show discussion – someone almost always wants to talk about how audiences respond to Theresa’s character as an ambitious, aggressive and assertive woman. We’ve had some audience members who tell us that Theresa comes across as bitch in the first few scenes (that’s the word that’s been used – one person a few weeks ago came real close to suggesting that she deserved what she got), and some who comment on the fact that society in general still perceives strong women in a very different way than strong men.

Anyone – male or female, assertive or passive – can be a victim of stalking, but there’s certainly a reason Rebecca Gilman wrote Theresa’s character the way she did. Part of what Rebecca does in all of her plays is to, as Michelle has described it in discussions, “push buttons.” This isn’t simply a play about stalking; it’s a play that uses cultural assumptions about gender and relationships and the traditional romantic narrative to provoke thought. It’s been interesting to hear how different people respond to this, and how it informs their view of Theresa throughout the play.

Leave a comment to share your thoughts. Do we as a society still percieve a strong woman as a “bitch”? Does this change the way we respond to her being a victim?

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2 Responses

  1. Bush is forever saying that democracies do not invade other countries and start wars. Well, he did just that. He invaded Iraq, started a war, and killed people. What do you think? What is he doing to us, and what is he doing to the world?
    Our country is in debt until forever, we don’t have jobs, and we live in fear. We have invaded a country and been responsible for thousands of deaths.
    The more people that the government puts in jails, the safer we are told to think we are. The real terrorists are wherever they are, but they aren’t living in a country with bars on the windows. We are.

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